Reviews

“… Damrau, as the frail Antonia who sings herself to death, showed no signs of frailty as she sang herself to death with gusto. She also took the very minor role of Stella in the prologue and epilogue.”

Mark Swed – Los Angeles Times

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The acclaimed German soprano Diana Damrau met her future husband, French bass-baritone Nicolas Testé, in a Munich church 13 years ago while performing Jean Francaix’s oratorio, “L’Apocalypse Selon.”

“It was a heaven-and-hell orchestra, a heaven-and-hell chorus, and Nicolas sang Christ,” Damrau said, adding “my redeemer” with a laugh.

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“As the emotionally unstable Elvira, a young Puritan woman in 17th-century England, Ms. Damrau sang with gleaming sound, volatile intensity and fearless execution of florid coloratura runs.”

Anthony Tommasini – The New York Times

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“On Saturday night for its New Year’s Eve gala, the Met introduced a new production of Gounod’s “Roméo et Juliette” starring Mr. Grigolo and Ms. Damrau as Shakespeare’s star-crossed adolescent lovers. In scene after scene, these exciting and charismatic artists disappeared into their characters, emboldening each other to sing with white-hot sensuality and impassioned lyricism …

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“As the Countess, Damrau was able to play out her comic tendencies and she was obviously enjoying herself. If she was the one who had caught the intrigue in a moment, she was already striking again as an affectionate wife who was profoundly offended by her husband’s jealousy. As expected, Damrau also provided a grandiose countess with a wide palette of vocal colors with her fine and seemingly effortless dynamic modulations. Her trills, sung in pianissimo, bore the character of a mischievous but at the same time quite furious Countess across the orchestra pit.”

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“Diana Damrau thrilled as a vocally sensational and dramatically mature countess. It is she who, by her disguise, regains the love of her husband.”

{Diana Damrau begeistert als eine stimmlich sensationelle und schauspielerisch reife Gräfin. Sie ist es, die durch ihre Verkleidungsintrige die Liebe ihres Mannes wieder zurückgewinnt.}

Thomas Schacher – Neue Zürcher Zeitung

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“The great soprano Diana Damrau has the necessary maturity to vocally interpret Richard Strauss’ “Four Last Songs”: The melancholy nature of these songs, in which the cycles of days, years, and a lifetime undergo an inextricable connection, represent matte and bright colors with an incredible range of light. ”

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“Diana Damrau is the ideal interpreter of Elvira; with her rich and full voice she stands in the center of a peculiar polyphony, where there is little argument, because the drama is set in a purely vocal and musical stratosphere.”

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“Diana Damrau not only has an amazing voice, but also possesses a wealth of overwhelming emotion . . . the last encore of a fun evening was greeted by energetic applause of a large audience at last. Behind that exuberant stage however, there is the whole substance of a voice that arrives securely and penetrating, which addresses the most inaccessible barriers by moving with a virtuosic and solid technical background and agility.”

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Recent Recordings

28 Mar

RT @LAOpera: Four stars and more for "Tales of Hoffmann." #TalesofHoffmann @PlacidoDomingo @DianaDamrau @VittorioGrigolo https://t.co/FYis

27 Mar

Villain and heroine: The real-life husband and wife onstage in 'Tales of Hoffmann’ | @latimes https://t.co/rnwuXcDQia

27 Mar

RT @LAOpera: Bravo to this dream team! #TalesofHoffmann #OpeningNight #opera #LAOpera #LAO31 #losangeles #dtla https://t.co/eqEbL0yCWI